Temperate Pinguicula

stevebradford

Moderator
Staff member
I’m glad you posted a hint of the manny spectacular displays you have created. I have seen these in person and manny more, they are inspirational! Meaning I’m going to copy you and hopefully make one half as stunning!
 

DaniL

Carnivore
These are so lovely. What type of rock do you use, and where do you find them? I have a lava rock I'm planning to experiment with when I can set up a space for it, but yours look more natural than the one I got from the aquarium store, lol!
 

Smilodonichthys

Carnivore
These are so lovely. What type of rock do you use, and where do you find them? I have a lava rock I'm planning to experiment with when I can set up a space for it, but yours look more natural than the one I got from the aquarium store, lol!
I found a couple chunks of this red pumice at a lake here on Vancouver Island. I'm keeping an eye out for more whenever I'm in the area. I'm so curious about what geology they originate from. I bet your rock will look nice once the moss grows in. When I first found this one it looked like a boring, water rounded pumice lump.
 

DaniL

Carnivore
Whenever you post the location (which I'm assuming is where these particular varieties have been found), my first thought is always that your ping rocks are travelling to all these fabulous places and having their picture taken there. Like beautiful, runaway garden gnomes. Instead of gnoming from place to place, they're pinging.
 

Smilodonichthys

Carnivore
Whenever you post the location (which I'm assuming is where these particular varieties have been found), my first thought is always that your ping rocks are travelling to all these fabulous places and having their picture taken there. Like beautiful, runaway garden gnomes. Instead of gnoming from place to place, they're pinging.
I wish that were the case! "Here's my ping rock on top of the leaning tower of Pisa and here it is at the London natural history museum enjoying the exhibits".

I'm a nerd for trying to know the provenance of the plants I grow for so many reasons:
- To research and get an idea of their habitat to try and grow them better and to mimic it to make the planting more natural looking.
- To notice and keep track of differences between the same taxon in different locations.
-If a species ever gets split into different taxa I can change or write a note on the tag. Like for example Pinguicula bohemica looks almost identical to P. vulgaris bicolour but has a different chromosome count. If I grew them both unlabeled It would be difficult to differentiate them.
- To know for myself and show to others that this was collected legitimately or historically and was not poached.
-And just because it's always fun and interesting to have more info. I get so much happiness learning about plants.
 

jeff

Carnivorous Plant Addict
"To know for myself and show to others that this was collected legitimately or historically and was not poached."

I still have some doubts about their origin.
initially most were taken from the wild like the Mexican ones and others elsewhere ;)

for information on all these temperate species go see my personal site : http://fern72.free.fr/siteweb/generalites.html
to "habitat " and "morphologie des taxons" species by species ,

I know most of them well since I have studied them ' in situ' :rolleyes:


jeff
 

Smilodonichthys

Carnivore
I too still have my doubts. You are right, that part of what I wrote doesn't really hold true. What I meant was that certain localities are well known in cultivation and it is a way to show that someone is being upfront with the origin of their plants. This is especially important for plants of conservation concern and/or that are rare.

I try and be transparent about where the plants I am introducing into cultivation originate and won't ever collect seed from eco reserves, etc. or from populations that would be adversely impacted. Maybe I have too much faith in my fellow collectors but I hope that is also something they take into consideration.

I know that what we grow is originally taken from the wild. I would just like for us to try and do so ethically in ways that don't overly impact these species that we love so much. I think it's important to hold those who take plants in a damaging way accountable by calling it out when we see it.

I really like your site Jeff and have learned so much from it! I appreciate all your work and sharing your knowledge. If you ever make it out to B.C. I'd love to show you some of our interesting Pinguicula sites and hear your opinions in person.
 

Lloyd Gordon

Cactus micrografter newbie.
Staff member
Having plant material descended from wild material collected in the past is a reality which we all face.
If it was collected a 100 years ago before there were laws and before we existed, there's nothing we can do. If it was collected illegally a few years ago, we shouldn't have it in our collections.
All we can do about the first group is be conservation minded and do our best to preserve biodiversity.
 

jeff

Carnivorous Plant Addict
a small question regarding the illegality or legality of a levy.
who decrees it and with what documents?
Is this well respected, especially when we see species on the market that have just been discovered and described?

in FRANCE we have a document for this awarded by competent authorities to professional botanists, now is this well respected I have some doubts ;)
 

Lloyd Gordon

Cactus micrografter newbie.
Staff member
Unfortunately in the matter of wild collecting, the laws are either non-existent or rarely applied. It's up to each of us as individuals to ask ourselves where the plant material we buy comes from and how likely it results from wild collection. We don't have to be perfect, just very careful.
 

Smilodonichthys

Carnivore
I agree with Lloyd. What he wrote seems to be the case here in Canada. I'm sure France is way ahead of us with their plant species protection. Here in B.C. we can't even adequately protect red-listed species from development. Especially on private land. Even the U.S. has better protections for species at risk.

You mention newly described species on the market. I remember reading about when it was found that at the type locality of P. poldinii every easily accessible seed pod had been cut. At around the same time there were large amounts of seed of the species being sold. I wonder if anything came of that?

I know there are permits available and required for some situations like in eco-reserves when collecting plant material for herbarium vouchers. First Nations permission for collection should also be asked if collecting on their traditional territories. I'm not familiar enough with the legality of every situation to give you a good answer though Jeff.
 
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