Bambusa bambos

Looking good! Once they establish they should take off. I have a family member who grows some bamboo decoratively down in the States, in the spring months it grows literally a foot a day or more, it's amazing stuff! Blocks out the road really well!
 
Good on you for transplanting quickly; in my experience they would quickly become nutrient deficient after germination. I was too slow to fertilize and/or transplant, on all three times I grew bamboo from seed!

What made you choose Bambusa bambos? The thornyness?
 

Scotian99

Carnivore
Good on you for transplanting quickly; in my experience they would quickly become nutrient deficient after germination. I was too slow to fertilize and/or transplant, on all three times I grew bamboo from seed!

What made you choose Bambusa bambos? The thornyness?
I noticed the yellowing of the leaves & knew the dirt was poor, good to know its expected! I truly got them as a impulse buy haha.
 
Have you tried growing cold-hardy bamboos? Are you zone 5b/6a ish? If so, there's a few which could work for you. I tried about two dozen bamboos for cold hardiness when I lived in Quebec city and Montreal. Out of the ones that survived over multiple years, some managed to overwinter their culms (stems), whereas others died back to the ground like big perennials.
 

Scotian99

Carnivore
Have you tried growing cold-hardy bamboos? Are you zone 5b/6a ish? If so, there's a few which could work for you. I tried about two dozen bamboos for cold hardiness when I lived in Quebec city and Montreal. Out of the ones that survived over multiple years, some managed to overwinter their culms (stems), whereas others died back to the ground like big perennials.
I have not! Will be doing some reading into that!
 
Information on the survivability and the practical limits of cold tolerance was hard to find when I was in college / researching the topic back in 2007-2012. Most information I was finding came from warmer regions, where they would take data from freak cold events, so their plants were not accustomed to dealing with severe cold injury on a yearly basis. Some information online lists the cold hardiness as the min. temperature when cold injury starts, not the limit of what the plants can recover from. In a region that will get severe winters every year the plants will grow a bit differently, so we have to adjust our expectations on how the plants are thought to behave. Some species aren't going to act like the evergreen tree-like plants some think of them as, yet they may perform well as large, graceful perennials. It will take them a few years to become accustomed to yearly dieback, they will bulk up much more slowly, and it will take them being established in an area (not moved or divided) to show their full potential. Also some sources (like Canada's Bamboo World, in Chilliwack BC), include the 'wind chill factor' in some of their minimum temperature claims. Take the info you find online, both positive and negative, with a grain of salt!

From my experience, the best place to start for an elegant, shurb-like bamboo is with Fargesis rufa "Green Panda". This is a selection of Fargesia rufa that is trademarked and propagated by a company called Oprins Plants. The fact that it is trademarked makes it easier to ensure that you're getting a clone of the same strain which has been proven hardy elsewhere. This selection seemed to be the best at overwintering its stems and some leaves in Lévis, Quebec, when planted in sheltered areas. I planted it at that location (my parent's house) in 2007 and has survived without winter protection since 2009. Even where/when it does die to the ground, it produces new culms that leaf out quickly to offer a nice look by the height of summer.

Online you might find Fargesia nitida noted as the 'most cold hardy', however it's not great for areas where it can't overwinter it's culms since they are very slow to branch and leaf out. Usually it sends up new culms (stems) on the first year, and these will only branch/leaf out on the following year. So if the culms die back to 10cm above ground level, you'll get a funny looking 15 cm high bush of leaves with leafless tall new stems sticking out.

Here are a few sources of information I've found useful:

Bamboo Garden Nursery in Portland, Oregon
I used to be involved with the American Bamboo Society and on multiple occasions spent time with the folks at Bamboo Garden Nursery. They are genuinely great people and I remember them very fondly.

Canada's Bamboo World in Chilliwack, British Columbia
This may be your best source for mail-order bamboo plants in Canada. They have a good selection, but were not great at customer service when I dealt with them.

Book:
Timber Press Pocket Guide To BAMBOOS, by Ted Jordan Meredith
This is the bamboo book I used the most. I think I read this book cover to cover, like a nerd novel, twice. Lol
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I hope this information helps you get started in your cold-hardy bamboo readings! I'm always happy to share information about these underutilized and cold hardy plants, so feel free to send me a PM if you ever want to chat!

Cheers!

Sam
 
Most, maybe all of these bamboos die. when they are mature, after one or several flowering stages in a row. (it may take up to three years)The whole process may take 80ty years or even more.
All plants of the same clone flower and die at the same time then. The only problem you can`t read this clock. without knowing at what time they germinated.
Some clones had spread to vast areas of the globe and suddenly died all over the world. Luckily they set seed and so we know the timeline of these offspring bamboos.
 

Sparrow

Carnivorous Plant Addict
Most, maybe all of these bamboos die. when they are mature, after one or several flowering stages in a row. (it may take up to three years)The whole process may take 80ty years or even more.
All plants of the same clone flower and die at the same time then. The only problem you can`t read this clock. without knowing at what time they germinated.
Some clones had spread to vast areas of the globe and suddenly died all over the world. Luckily they set seed and so we know the timeline of these offspring bamboos.
I saw this first hand last summer with some black bamboo in my area.
 
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