Sarracenia Flowers and Pollination

They do produce a variety of whiffs, a bad egg gas smell is normally anaerobic conditions in the substrate, not a good sign - the water level is too high for too long, the cats pee is normally flowers when they open (or indeed cats pee), but manure is a new one on me, rotting prey sometimes give off a smell, but I wouldn't have labelled it as pleasant as manure.
Cheers
Steve
 

Lloyd Gordon

Parasitic Plant Aficionado
Staff member
I think you'd have to be a dog or maybe a cheese lover to truly distinguish between manure and rotting bugs.
 

Yokiebear

Seedling
When I noticed the smell I was moving all of my potted plants to a different location in the yard but I will give it another smell test today. Water level too high - I do keep my plants soaking in water with the potted plant sitting within a slightly larger pot filled to about 80-90% of the pot height is that bad?

Lol, Cat pee - I'm allergic to cats so I'm not familiar with that smell.

Division of plants - if I do it before it comes out of dormancy how do you decide where to draw the line. Pull pieces/chunks off and replant them?
 
By the sounds of it its water level causing the whiff. 80-90% of water over of the growing plant pot height isnt good, Sarracenia have a long root system and they need oxygen, at that height they will get very little at a constant water level. It isn't a problem to have occasional inundations to that level, if the water level in the tray varies over a few days, as, as the water level falls it will draw oxygen down to the roots and should stop your funky whiffs!
Unless your pots are very tall a couple of inches of water will do the job, a sort of rule of thumb is water level no higher than 25% of the pot height and vary the heights to allow air in.

Division - in spring, remove the plant from the pot wash the substrate off and gently bend the rhizome, they tell you where they want to break and how many breaks to take, straighten the wound with a sterilised knife to minimise the surface area exposed. Take your divisions with as many roots as possible to minimise shock and allow new growth to form a callous over the wound as fast as possible. Repot all immediately. You can take more by cutting the rhizome with a knife where you want, but sometimes they don't grow as well. Cut out any brown, corky bits back to white rhizome.
Cheers
Steve
 
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daniella3d

Carnivorous Plant Addict
I also want to add that if you ever get a piece of rhizome that not have a grow point but have root, you can plant it and it will develop pitcher eventually. If the rhizome does not have root, it can still be planted and usually will develop root but it is best to have division with roots. Just to say that I do not throw away rhizome that does not have roots or division, as it can usually be saved. I planted a division of chelsony that did not have any roots and it survived. I did not put it in bright sunlight but by the end of summer it had grown new pitchers and had roots.
 

Yokiebear

Seedling
Thanks Steve and Daniella3d.
I had to google what a Rhizome was but I get it now. It’s the white stem below the peat moss that may or may not have roots.
 

daniella3d

Carnivorous Plant Addict
It must have roots to survive long term. Sometime when they don't have roots it is still possible to plant it and it will grow back some roots, but eventually they do need it.
 

Yokiebear

Seedling
I suggest this kit, it come with a T5HO light and a humidity dome. Remember that the pots will need to rest in water, one inch maybe, at all time. Little seedlings need a high humidity when germinating. They also have a LED kit which is also very good. If it is on the cold side in your house in winter, it is best to also buy a heat mat to put underneath the tray.

I have been looking at cheaper alternatives to winter lighting to grow indoor from seed - do they require specific wavelengths of light to grow?

I saw this light panel on Amazon and I was thinking about mounting it on an IKEA low profile translucent storage box. I am still unclear on one part - does it need to stratify in light or in the dark in the fridge? One thoughI had was to place it in a translucent box in the corner of the basement or garage and install the light when needed.

LED Grow Light, Aceple 20W Indoor Growing Ultra-Thin Panel Plant Light with Switch and Pl... https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0761KKJGQ/ref=cm_sw_r_sms_api_i_MtDlFb.

Do you have any pics you could share on your winter setup?
 

pitcherperfect

Carnivorous Plant Addict
I have been looking at cheaper alternatives to winter lighting to grow indoor from seed - do they require specific wavelengths of light to grow?

I saw this light panel on Amazon and I was thinking about mounting it on an IKEA low profile translucent storage box. I am still unclear on one part - does it need to stratify in light or in the dark in the fridge? One thoughI had was to place it in a translucent box in the corner of the basement or garage and install the light when needed.

LED Grow Light, Aceple 20W Indoor Growing Ultra-Thin Panel Plant Light with Switch and Pl... https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0761KKJGQ/ref=cm_sw_r_sms_api_i_MtDlFb.

Do you have any pics you could share on your winter setup?
I have a couple of these little panels and they put out really good light! I prefer to use the white light grow lights whenever possible cause it makes it a lot easier to see whats going on with my plants.

Just a note on pots going anaerobic: I have a few sarracenia in fabric pots (using the tray watering method) and they seem to really like it.
I use fabric pots for all of my non carnivorous plants and had a bunch laying around so I figured I would give it a shot, thinking that more oxygen diffusion through the soil cant be a bad thing. The only drawback that I can see is you have to be a little bit careful moving the pots so you dont disturb the roots too much but thats easy enough
 
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