Rooting Nepenthes cuttings in water

pitcherperfect

Carnivorous Plant Addict
yep of cause , you do what works for you , , many years ago i was doing aproxx 250 to 400 cuttings a month to sell on ebay , made some good $$ on that over several years, the leaf always got in the way , and tangles up , is why i cut the tendrils off and probably why many did the leaf cut too from there experiences , it works of cause , but cut down what the leaf function is intended for ?? not sure IMO :) just my humble opinion :)
I used to grow a lot of weed and cutting the leaves like this during cloning is pretty common practice. I have been told that it allows the plants to uptake water faster because they are losing more of it through the leaves. Dont know if there is science backing that up or not but a lot of people do it so there might be something to it.

edit: i have found a couple other justifications for doing it as well, including 1)"it requires less energy for the plant to regulate the stolons on half the leaf area" (though it seems to me that it makes more sense to just remove half of the leaves instead of cutting every leaf in half because it must take more energy to repair that damage, no?)
2) "the cutting doesnt need to hydrate as much leaf matter this way" (my same complaint applies to that one though)
I'll add any more that i find :)
 
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JosephElliott

Carnivore
Hey Willy, looks like you have a good thing going here and John, good to know about the NAA accelerating the roots. I don’t have anything to really add except that a few years ago I did a bunch of alata cuttings and used those little water tubes that you get when you buy roses. Worked ok, about 60% success but I also just had them on the window sill, no dome to keep the humidity up.
 

John Yates

Carnivorous Plant Addict
I used to grow a lot of weed and cutting the leaves like this during cloning is pretty common practice. I have been told that it allows the plants to uptake water faster because they are losing more of it through the leaves. Dont know if there is science backing that up or not but a lot of people do it so there might be something to it.

edit: i have found a couple other justifications for doing it as well, including 1)"it requires less energy for the plant to regulate the stolons on half the leaf area" (though it seems to me that it makes more sense to just remove half of the leaves instead of cutting every leaf in half because it must take more energy to repair that damage, no?)
2) "the cutting doesnt need to hydrate as much leaf matter this way" (my same complaint applies to that one though)
I'll add any more that i find :)

yep there has been many ways to do cuttings , some work better for people that other ways , a lot may have to do with conditions, timing and lighting, and water , I did most in just pots of live sphagnum some 15 years back or more even now i think about it :) , that worked well too at the right time of year , found packing the sphag in tight around the cutting stem increased the root growth, putting them close to the edge of the pot helped even more !! the aeration and changing of the water helps a lot too in water rooting system , i also started with cutting the leaf in 1/4 and 1/2 some 20 or so years back ,when i had up to 600 or more neps in the green house , for me the leaving of the whole leaf was better in my climate and conditions, ,dont think there is a right or wrong here , as always , you do what works for you and your growing conditions , this may take a little experimentation and time .
 

Apoplast

Carnivore
IAA and IBA are easy to come by in the States, but because NAA is listed as pesticide here it is much harder to come by. I'm curious, is this true in Canada and Oz, or can you get commercial rooting hormones made with NAA?
 

Apoplast

Carnivore
I mean I can get it from Sigma Aldrich as well. Just wasn't sure if like the Canadian version of Clone-X of something included NAA but not the one sold in the States. I know how you guys like your codeine up there. ;)
 
I do the lanolin thing with auxin too to help close the wounds I create in plant tissue when I make cuttings. I wonder if it actually makes a difference.
 

Cin

Plant
I would like to try taking a cutting or two from my old Nepenthes, but everything I’ve read seems to indicate cuttings need to be taken from a climbing stem which is an upper pitchers stem, right? I’ve never had that on my old plant. I think it needs more light which I will rectify in spring...I have tried a cutting or two before but with no luck. can someone let me know if I’m reading this climbing stem instruction correctly? oh, it needs reporting too, which I intend to see to in the coming months...
 

Lloyd Gordon

Parasitic Plant Aficionado
Staff member
I wasn't aware of the upper stem requirement. By the time mine have gotten tall enough to take cuttings, they're pretty well into climbing mode.
 
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