Nepenthes expenditions 1990s

Flytrap

Plant
Hi all,

Back in the 1980-90s, I ran an office in Singapore... and spend a great deal of time exploring the tropical rainforests of Borneo, Indonesia and Malaysia. I met a number of wonderful CP enthusiasts, including folks in the botany departments at the various universities. In particular, Dr Tan Wee Kiat of the National University of Singapore. He and his colleagues would invite me for treks throughout the region. Dr Tan later wrote a number of books on CPs, and over the years we exchanged CP seeds. Many of the Nepenthes I grew for trading originated from the seeds mailed to me from Dr Tan, and now that I've rekindled my interest in CPs, I'm sharing a few photos I'd amassed over the years with all of you.

Most of the photos of the wild growing Neps were taken by me, some by my colleagues, and unfortunately, I can't remember who had mailed me some of the photos. I scanned them yesterday... but if you plan to re-post or share the photo, please attribute the copyright and use, back to myself, ©David Wong. Most of the plants you'll recognize. Species include N. villosa, burbidgea, rajah, lowii, macfarlanii, rafflesiana, gracilis, ampullaria and some hybrids -x trichocarpa, x hookeriana, xkinabaluensis and others. I've also a lot more photos on slides, including wild growing veitchii, upper ampullaria pitchers, bicalcarata, and others. I'd have to source a slide scanner to share those photos.

Thank you

note: I could only load up 10 photos, I'll upload some more in the comments…

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Chen

Seedling
Thank you for sharing your experiences with us. It must have been quite fortunate to meet all those enthusiasts as well as go trekking through the natural environment. Is it as humid as they say?
 

Flytrap

Plant
Thank you for sharing your experiences with us. It must have been quite fortunate to meet all those enthusiasts as well as go trekking through the natural environment. Is it as humid as they say?
Yes. Very humid and lots of mosquitoes. The most difficult thing was how quickly darkness came. It got pitch black by around 6 pm. So if we didn’t start descending down the mountain before 4:30 pm, we’d be in trouble cuz we wouldn’t be able to see where we were going
 

VarunA

Carnivore
Haha! very nice D. I still remember how harsh it was coming to grips with it becoming dark right away. The descent down Mt. Trusmadi was around 6:30 or 7PM and man it was pitch black and pouring rain. The coolest thing around that time though was also seeing some beautiful bioluminescent mushrooms in the forest. They were so bright and incredible.
 

Flytrap

Plant
Haha! very nice D. I still remember how harsh it was coming to grips with it becoming dark right away. The descent down Mt. Trusmadi was around 6:30 or 7PM and man it was pitch black and pouring rain. The coolest thing around that time though was also seeing some beautiful bioluminescent mushrooms in the forest. They were so bright and incredible.
Oh... we missed the bioluminescent mushrooms. Oh, yeah, the heavy rains... very predictable. Rains started pouring at around 6pm everyday, like clockwork.

Would love to see your photos Mr. V!
 
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