cp noob. all my Q's

Discussion in 'General Forum Questions and Discussion' started by Karie-Lou Wood, Oct 11, 2018.

  1. Karie-Lou Wood

    Karie-Lou Wood Sprout

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    Hello everyone, sorry i haven't been active; i got a cold that was just awful! But im back now with all my questions lol. Ok so here i go!

    1. What do cp usually like there soil mix to be?
    2. How often do you water?
    3. Do you have to mist them if you have a humidifier? If so how often?
    4. What temp/ humidity levels do they like.
    5. What type of light do they like?
    6. Are some cold tolerent and others not? If so how can you tell the difference?
    7. Do they all go dormant in winter or only outside ones that r cold tolerent?
    8. How can you tell when there just going dormant and not dieing?
    9. What do they like as fertalizers?
    10. How often should I fertalize, and how much?

    Ok i think that's all my questions for care...... At least for now lol. I am looking for info on all cp's not just vinus fly traps or just nepanthes because i really like all of them so any info is great. I also live in Colorado and while i have heard of bog garden's being able to thrive with freezing periods like we have here im not totally sure if its true since ive only heard of not seen one. so if any of you have info on them i would love to know ! Thank you everyone in advance for sharing your knowledge with me, and hope today is wonderful for everyone.
     
  2. Raymond

    Raymond Carnivore

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    1.the standard soil mix 1:1 peat to Perlite but you can sub Perlite for WASHED sand (recommend silica sand)
    2. Water only when your soil doesn't look moist, its shouldnt be so wet that when you squeeze it lots of water comes ou
    3. Relative room humity would be just fine but for drosera's 75 to 100 percent for max dew
    4. Misting only needed for certain Neps and Helis
    5. Maximum sun light would be the easy answer but for indoor lights it varies between people 12 to 16 hours of T5HO light should be good
    6. You would have to google the plant to find out if it's tempurate or tropical, just note all vfts can go dormant all sarracenia go dormant and only some drosera go dormant
    7. All tempurate plants are cold hardy to 0 degrees celcious with purps being the hardiest
    8. If it's green it's alive, if it looks like a bud it's dormant. If the sarracenias new growth looks pointed instead of a pitcher it's dormant
    9. For new growers don't fertilizer
    10. See 9

    For bogs, if they can survive in Canada I'm sure they will survive in Colerado with the same protection
     
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  3. Karie-Lou Wood

    Karie-Lou Wood Sprout

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    Thank to
    Thank you so much! Now im thinking i might have thrown dormant venus fly traps in the trash... I feel stupid lol but now i know. Now that i know they don't like a lot of things i was doing to. also i forgot to ask what are common pests that could harm cp's and if there's a good pest control for them in general
     
  4. WillyCKH

    WillyCKH CPSC and PotM Moderator Staff Member

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    1. See this thread for some recipes
    2. I keep mine in water trays, filling 1-3cm water at all time
    3. It really depends on the humidity level (%RH), I'd recommend getting a Digital Hygrometer & Thermometer (Shameless adv: I sell them for $8+shipping)
    4. It depends on the species, and the conditions that they like. For example, Nepenthes have preference of Lowland, Intermediate, Highland, and more. It's good to search up the species and look for more information.
    5. I grow my indoor plants under LEDs, they seem to be very happy
    6. Again, species specific. In general, if a plant is originated from North america, it can bear cooler temperature than one that is from Asia
    7. Temperate species require dormancy to remain healthy
    8. It depends on the plant. Some will die back to the roots, some will form a hibernacula, some will behave differently.
    9. In general, most CPs like Maxsea spray if they don't catch bugs much on their own. Soil fertilizer is not recommended.
    10. It depends on the plant food that you are applying.
     
  5. Lloyd Gordon

    Lloyd Gordon Parasitic Plant Aficionado Staff Member

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    There's more than enough information on this forum with the old one:

    http://ocps.proboards.com/

    Start with cheap, easy subtropical plants like Drosera capensis. Gain some confidence and experience and then go for the harder stuff.

    Going all at once with temperate or difficult or too many plants at once is a recipe for disappointment and losing money.
     
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  6. shelilla

    shelilla Carnivore

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    1. This question has already been answered, but I know from experience I had a lot of trouble finding just readily available, pure silica sand here that would be good for my plants, never mind large-grained sand. Ended up finding some industrial plant that provides (thankfully not enormous) bags of sandblasting silica sand. It took a lot of research for me to find this out and match it up with what I wanted for my plants, so if I can help speed up the process for you I happily will. I live in Alberta, so I'm not sure if you have Lane Mountain brand sand in Colorado. Target and Quickrete are very useful brands that offer a lot of different choices for sands and such. I did a bit of research and I happened upon this document: https://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/silica/780298.pdf , so if you do decide on using sand this might help. Sorry for the information overload, I just remember doing a lot of research after one of my plants died on the best soil mixtures and especially the optimum choice of sand for CPs. 100% sharp silica between #14, #12 or #16 grain size. You can ignore this info if it's too much at once haha, it's just nice stuff and about the best you can get for CPs. But they will easily do fine with much worse sands (like unwashed play sand which I started with haha).
    If you really wanna dig into the technical stuff, this article and site is incredibly useful and what I used to decide the soil and lighting for most of my plants. http://www.carnivorousplants.org/grow/SoilsWaterLight/CPmix

    2. Well I definitely don't have to water my CPs as often as I do my ornamental peppers and mimosa (their leaves start drooping after two days!). If you live in a place as dry as I do, you'll want to put a dome or bag over sundews and pitcher plants, because they hate being dry. I hardly ever have to water the plants I keep in bags, the only downside is they don't catch annoying gnats when they're flying around the room! For the ones that don't have anything over them to keep the humidity, I tend to put dried sphagnum moss over the top, just keeps the water from evaporating as fast and lets me know when I should water them when it starts getting flaky dry.

    3. As willy said, it depends on the humidity level. Also it's species dependent too. My flytraps do fine in 20% or less room humidity here, in fact I found they grew a lot slower and didn't like it when I grew then in the same humidity as I do my sundews and pitchers. I've tried a humidifier before, but honestly unless its like a humidifier used for reptile/amphibian tanks or you have a greenhouse, it's not worth it, especially if it's a room humidifier indoors. That'd lead to mold problems.. As tricky as it can be, I've learned through trial and error growing mine indoors without a greenhouse that if you adapt to each species' individual needs, that's when they'll thrive the most. I improvise a lot. I keep my pitcher plants in a tub, with a cut up clear plastic garbage bag I got from walmart as a lid. The humidity constantly stays at a stable 50%, no humidifier needed. And for a lot I just get a large sandwich/freezer bag and pull it over the pot for humidity.

    5. Here's some info you might find useful for light, if you want to grow them indoors and not next to a window. Here light is not stable at all and can vary from desertlike glaring rays of light one day to clouded over and shady the next. Some plants were getting burned and others weren't getting enough light. LEDs are more expensive and harder to find, and also you have to get a bunch of different types to mimic the right kind of light. On the plus, they generate no heat, so no worries about the room becoming boiling or your plants burning. But for a beginner I'd stick to fluorescent. This should be useful to you http://www.carnivorousplants.org/grow/SoilsWaterLight/FluorescentLighting again, just like the soil it's not a huge deal if you have less than ideal lights, long-term and health wise they won't be the best but they'll push through it fine so long as there's no major issues.

    6. Only fly traps, sarrencias and other more pondy plants which I don't grow (probably bladderwort) are cold tolerant as they are the only species that grow in North America.

    7. Species dependent, flytraps do but it's possible to skip it too. Just google it up!

    9. Nope, NO fertilizers! Not in the soil at least :p that's one surefire way to kill a CP. You can give some liquid orchid fertilizer, I'm not sure if you can water them with it or not. I've also heard of someone diluting coffee with water and using this as food for their plants(?) can't remember if it was put in the traps or watered with it though. Anyways, easiest way is bugs. And if you don't like finding bugs, freezedried bloodworms you can feed to bettas makes a great supplement, as it's cheap, easy to find and can be fed to any plant all year round.

    10. As others said, it depends. Often I forget mine need food as a replacement for fertilizer and don't feed them for a month or longer (woops!), but they don't care and just keep on doing their planty thing, they just slow down growth a lot and produce smaller traps.
     
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  7. Lloyd Gordon

    Lloyd Gordon Parasitic Plant Aficionado Staff Member

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    Also with silica sand: wash thoroughly with a hose until the return is clear. You don't want to inhale silica dust.
     
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